Romanian Jewish Community President announces restoration of Constanța synagogue

The restoration of the long-ruined Ashkenazic Great Synagogue in the Black Sea port of Constanța, Romania will finally go ahead.

On June 12, The President of the Federation of Jewish Communities of Romania Silviu Vexler announced on a Facebook post that he had signed a contract “for the execution of restoration and general rehabilitation works” at the synagogue.

“One of the most beautiful and emblematic Jewish places of worship in Romania, with a fascinating story and a true symbol of the Municipality of Constanța, is saved and will come back to life, to be restored both to the Jews of Romania and to the whole society, ” he wrote.

Vexler said that the agreement came after “nine years of sustained efforts, even when everything seems hopeless.”

Vexler expressed “deep gratitude to all who have been involved and supported this endeavor over the years” including the Minister of Development, Public Works and Administration and the President of the Board of Directors of the National Investment Company.

Adolf Linz designed the synagogue in the Moorish style, and it was constructed from 1910 to 1914. It stands as the only remaining synagogue in the city.

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