France granted a human rights prize to Al-Haq, a leader in the anti-Israel lawfare and boycott efforts with ties to the terrorist group the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine (PFLP), and Israeli NGO B’Tselem.

The two organisations are sharing one of five Human Rights Awards of the French Republic. France’s Justice Minister Nicole Belloubet will present the awards at a ceremony in Paris on December 10.

Al-Haq says it documents “violations of the individual and collective rights of Palestinians in the Occupied Palestinian Territories,” and brings that documentation before international bodies to hold Israel accountable.

The organisation’s General Director Shawan Jabarin is known to have ties to the PFLP. Israel convicted Jabarin in 1985 of recruiting members for the terrorist organisation, and has been denied exit visas by both Israel and Jordan. As recently as 2009, Israel’s Supreme Court found that evidence of Jabarin’s continued “involvement in the activity of terrorist entities is concrete and reliable.”

Al-Haq is a leading Palestinian organisation in the anti-Israel boycott, divestment and sanctions movement, and it has submitted documents to the International Criminal Court against Israel. It has also filed cases meant to disrupt trade with Israel in the Netherlands, Canada and the UK.

Jabarin said in response that the award is a great honour, and called B’Tselem “partners in our struggle for justice and a better future, without oppression and occupation.

B’Tselem CEO Hagai El-Ad said: “We share the same values as Al-Haq and the understanding that the end of the occupation is necessary for a future based on human rights, equality and freedom.”

Israel’s Deputy Minister for Diplomacy Michael Oren said: “France gives its highest award to B’Tselem and al-Haq organisations that accuse Israel of apartheid, delegitimise us internationally, defend terror, and support BDS. The same France cannot claim that it fights antisemitism.”

French lawmaker Meyer Habib, who represents expats in the Mediterranean region, including Israel, called the award “a mark of Cain” for France.